3000 Level Courses

AP/POLS 3011 3.0 The Politics of Sexuality/Sexual Politics

Human sexuality has become a contested site of political and social conflicts. Since the 1980's research has challenged popular conceptions of sex as a natural and biological force. The course explores the socio-political construction of sexualities through the fields of psychoanalysis, law, sexology, and popular culture. Focusing on Canada, the United States and Britain from the nineteenth century to the present, the course investigates a range of subjects: gender identity, heterosexuality, homosexuality, transsexuality, bisexuality, 'femininity', 'masculinity', transgender, sexual representation, pornography, and disease.

Themes:

  • Political Thought
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course Credit Exclusions: AS/POLS 3000A 3.0

AP/POLS 3020 3.0 Utopia, Power and Sovereignty

How did social change, wars and the confrontation between Protestantism and Catholicism shape political thought in the Renaissance and Reformation? Issues of power, liberty, faith, obedience, self interest and the common good are explored through More, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hooker, Luther and Calvin among others.

Themes:

  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Political Thought
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course credit exclusion: AS/AP/POLS 3010 6.0

AP/POLS 3025 3.0 A Century of Revolution

In the 1600's, sweeping transformations of social, economic, religious and political institutions dramatically altered England. Through James I, Hobbes, Locke, the Levellers and Diggers and others' works, we explore how this 'century of revolution' shaped modern political thought.

Themes:

  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Political Thought
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course credit exclusion: AP/POLS 3020 6.0

AP/POLS 3040 6.0 Modern Political Thought: Kant to Foucault

In this course we study those thinkers whose theories have had the greatest impact in shaping the modern world including Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Marcuse and Foucault.

Themes:

  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course credit exclusion:
GL/PHIL 3637 6.0,
GL/POLS 3637 6.0

AP/POLS 3045 3.0 Human Rights, Islamic Thought and Politics

Critically examines the relationship between Islam and human rights. Describes the state of human rights in Muslin-majority countries and debates within them and amongst Muslim minorities in liberal democracies over the compatibility of human rights claims with Islamic principles.

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3800 3.0

AP/POLS 3065 3.0 Political Culture of Race and Racism

This course analyzes the political, economic, and cultural development of "race" and "racism" in political discourse. Attention is given to categories such as "racialization", and "the social construction of race". We deal with the historical development of "identity".

Themes:

  • Political Thought
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course credit exclusion:
AS/POLS 3000B 3.0,
AS/AP/POLS 3040 3.0,
AS/AP/POLS 3045 3.0,
AS/AP/POLS 3035 3.0

AP/POLS 3070 3.0 Psychology and Politics

This course involves the use of psychoanalytic and psychological concepts in contemporary political thought. After outlining key psychological theories, beginning with Freud, the focus is on themes such as ideology and freedom, democracy and paranoia, sexual repression and desire, patriarchy and gender, power and resistance, psychopathology and politics.

Themes:

  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Political Thought
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion

Course credit exclusion:
AS/POLS 3070 6.0

AP/POLS 3075 3.0 Law, Justice and Jurisprudence

This course explores some fundamental issues in liberal conceptions of law and some of the criticisms of this conception. Jurisprudence is concerned with the study of the nature of legal systems and the analysis of the fundamental principles on which they are founded. It is therefore a theory with two well-defined parts: a descriptive part, outlining the nature, sociology, and history of existing systems; and an analytical part, in which the concept of law and the principles for its justification are examined.

This second part is concerned not with what any particular system is like, but rather with what distinguishes law from other social institutions, as well as its links to politics and to ethics. In this course, we shall be concerned mainly with the latter, that is, with the study of the nature of law and its ethical and political justification.

Themes:

  • Political Thought
  • Public Policy & Administration
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/POLS 3130 6.0

AP/POLS 3085 6.0 Political Economy as a Moral Science; The Economics of Marx and Keynes

The course develops a conception of "political economy as "moral science" through study of the economics of Karl Marx and John Maynard Keynes. It also explores the relation of the conception to German idealist philosophy and psychoanalytic psychology.

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/SOSC 3552 6.0

AP/POLS 3100 3.0 Media, Identity and Citizenship

This course examines the principles and theories underlying communications and cultural practices, policy and regulation in Canada, with particular attention to the role of the state and the private sector in shaping the nature of political and cultural discourse in Canada. Concepts of identity and citizenship in a multi-cultural society are considered in the context of media practices and policy.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  •  Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion

AP/POLS 3102 3.0: Aboriginal Politics in Canada

Introduces students to the study of aboriginal politics in Canada. A survey course, it examines the relationships between indigenous peoples, the state, society and economy in Canada. Topics include: globalization, (de)colonization, citizenship, constitutionalism, gender, land claims, self-government and resistance.

Course credit exclusions: AP/POLS 3102 3.00 (Prior to Fall 2014)

AP/POLS 3110 3.0 The Process of Urban Politics: Institutions and Power

In This course, we examine a broadened notion of "politics" as it plays out on various scales and arenas within the urban system. In particular, we explore how various social groups in cities experience, struggle over, and negotiate their (changed) economic, political and social conditions, and how, through such processes, they create politicized subcultures and spaces.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Public Policy & Administration

Course Credit Exclusion: GL/POLS 3550 3.0

AP/POLS 3120 3.0: Quebec: Politics, Power & Resistance

This course investigates Quebec government and politics in relation to internal policy processes and the wider context of Canadian government and politics. The course will apply theories of nationalism, feminism, race and class relations, conflict, economic and social change, and social movements and political parties.

Prerequisite: AP/POLS 2910 6.00 or AP/POLS 2940 6.00 or permission of the instructor.

Course credit exclusion: GL/POLS 3360 6.00.

AP/POLS 3125 6.0 Canadian Political Economy

This course examines Canadian economic development and state formation in the context of the world market and, in particular, Canada's place within North America. The course also reviews some of the key writers that have debated Canada's economic position in the world.

The first term develops some of the key concepts of political economy for the course; it also traces the economic development of Canada from colonialism to the new era of free trade. The second term covers key current issues in the political economy of Canada, such as neoliberalism, NAFTA and trade issues, and industrial and social policies.

The course seeks to address the following questions: how and why did Canada emerge as a major capitalist country; what has been the influence of neoliberalism on Canada's recent trajectory of economic and social development; and what alternative future paths of development might be foreseen for Canada?

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Cross-listed: AS/POLS 3125 6.0, AK/SOCI 3125 6.0, AP/HREQ 3125 6.0

Course credit exclusion:
AS/POLS 3125 3.0,
AK/POLS 3580 6.0,
AK/SOCI 3390U 6.0,
AK/SOCI 3585 6.0

AP/POLS 3135 3.0 Public Law I: The Constitution and the Courts in Canada

This course examines the Canadian structure, judicial review of the federal division of powers, and the role of the courts and the legal profession in Canada. A strong emphasis is placed on the relationship between law, politics and public policy. This is a technology-enhanced learning course, and students participate in electronic discussion groups and mock trials.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics
  • Public Policy & Administration

Cross-listed: AK/POLS 3135 3.0, GL/POLS 3135 3.0, AP/PPAS 3135 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3405 6.0,
AK/ SOCI 3900C 6.0,
AS/POLS 3600 3.0,
AK/POLS 3405 6.0

AP/POLS 3136 3.0 Public Law II: The Charter of Rights and Freedoms

This course focuses on judicial interpretation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This includes freedom of expression, legal rights, equality rights, language rights, and the rights of aboriginal peoples. A section of the course examines judicial review of public administration. This is a technology enhanced learning course, and students participate in electronic discussion groups and mock trials.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics
  • Public Policy & Administration

Cross-listed: AK/POLS 3136 3.0, GL/POLS 3136 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
AS/SOSC 3360 6.0,
AK/POLS 3405 6.0,
AK/SOCI 3405 6.0,
AK/SOCI 3561 6.0,
AK/SOCI 3900C 6.0,
AS/POLS 3605 3.0

AP/POLS 3140 3.0 The Political Economy of Labour in Canada

This course analyses the role of organized labour in the political economy of Canada. We trace the interaction of labour, business and government and focus on the contemporary struggle of labour, as it confronts the corporate state.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Cross-listed: AS/SOSC 3280 3.0,

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3209L,
AS/POLS 3140 6.0,
AS/SOSC 3280 6.0

AP/POLS 3145 3.0 Government and Business in Canada

This course describes the role of market forces and corporate institutions in shaping Canada's political economy, and the attempt to control or regulate the corporate sector.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Cross-listed: AK/POLS 3145 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3209L 3.0,
AS/POLS 3000B 3.0

AP/POLS 3150 3.0 Political Parties in Canada

This course is a critical inquiry into the evolution of political parties in conjunction with the extension of forms of liberal democracy in Canada. The course will investigate arguments about what things political parties should do in a democracy; whether parties represent the views of citizens; how Canadian political parties are organized and how they function.

The course also investigates the role of ideological commitments in political practice; reforming out-of-date electoral system; the changing ways in which party leaders are selected; reforming our laws that control the corrupting effect of money in politics; who financially supports which parties, and who participates in political parties and elections.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Public Policy & Administration

Cross-listed: AK/POLS 3150 3.0

Course credit exclusion: AK/POLS 3209K 3.0

AP/POLS 3155 3.0 Election Campaigns in Canada

This course is a critical inside examination of federal and provincial election campaigns in Canada. The topics covered will include: designing campaign themes and strategies, polling and public opinion research in campaigns, selling the message through TV campaign advertising, promoting campaign messages by controlling interactions with the media, leaders' debates, the increasing participation in campaigns of advocacy groups and the importance of money – both raising and spending – in modern campaigns. Lectures include guests from the campaigning business. Students are expected to complete a primary research project that investigates some aspect of campaigns. Much of the primary research materials are supplied by the instructor.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Public Policy & Administration

Cross-listed: AS/POLS 3155 3.0

Course credit exclusion: AK/POLS 3209H 3.0

AP/POLS 3170 3.0 Canada’s Social Policy

This course examines Canadian federal, provincial and municipal programs aimed at those outside the paid labour force. Programs covered include health care, child care services and benefits, old age pensions, social assistance and disability. Covers current debates on future of the welfare state.

Cross-listed: AP/HREQ 3761 3.0, AP/PPAS 3761 3.0

AP/POLS 3171 3.0 Canada’s Labour Market Policy

This course examines the development and operation of government programs in Canada directed at influencing labour supply/demand, including training and education policies, employment/unemployment insurance, job creation policies, collective bargaining, employment standards, pay equity and employment equity and immigration. It considers current debates about the role of the state in regulating the labour market.

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3762 3.0

AP/POLS 3175 3.0 Ontario Provincial Politics

Following a brief review of Ontario political history, the course focuses on substantive problems of Ontario provincial politics and on formal and informal institutions of Ontario's government in the context of the Canadian federal system.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Public Policy & Administration

Course credit exclusion:
AS/POLS 3170 6.0,
AK/POLS 4560 3.0,
AK/POLS 4109D 3.0,
GL/POLS 3400 6.0

AP/POLS 3180 6.0 Politics and the Mass Media

An inquiry into the communicative aspects of politics and the relation of politics to the mass media, with an historical investigation into the influence of cultural technologies, media institutions and the organization of the news on public opinion and democracy.

Course Credit Exclusion: AK/POLS 3320 M6.0 (prior to Summer 2004)

AP/POLS 3190 6.0 Public Administration

This course examines the theory and practice of public administration and the machinery of government, with particular reference to Canada. It discusses who makes policy, how policy is developed and implemented, and how activities in the public sector are controlled and evaluated.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Public Policy & Administration

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3405 6.0,
AK/POLS 3410 6.0,
AP/PPAS 3910 6.0,
AK/SOCI 3405 6.0,
GL/POLS 3240 6.0

AP/POLS 3195 3.0 Multilevel Governance, Policy and Program Delivery in Canada

Explores public policy development and program delivery in Canada as activities shaped by the interaction of multiple actors at the Canadian and international levels, including federal, provincial and municipal governments, international institutions and agreements, and nongovernmental organizations.

Cross-listed: AP/HREQ 3140 3.0, AP/PPAS 3140 3.0

AP/POLS 3200 3.0 Global Conflict and Security I

This course acquaints students with issues surrounding conflict and security in global politics as it has evolved over the past three centuries. It examines the history and development of war from the medieval period to the era of "total war", and the main currents of thought on issues of war and peace.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Violence & Security

AP/POLS 3210 3.0 Global Conflict and Security II

This course explores the issues surrounding different dimensions of conflict and security in the contemporary period. In its broadest sense, security can be understood not only in military, but also in political, economic, cultural and social terms. The course examines the various ways of thinking about security, and explores the contemporary problems and practices of international security, through the lenses provided by contemporary conceptual debates.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Violence & Security

Prerequisite: AP/POLS 3200 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
GL/ILST 3605 3.0,
GL/POLS 3605 3.0,
GL/SOSC 3605 3.0

AP/POLS 3220 3.0 Comparative Foreign Policy Analysis

An introduction to the objectives and instruments of understanding foreign policy from a comparative perspective. Special attention will be devoted to the United States and its inter-connections with the North Pacific in the 20th century. Points of national comparison will include China, Japan and Russia/USSR. A principal theme will be the interaction of domestic and external sources of foreign policy decisions.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Course credit exclusion:
AS/POLS 3220 6.0,
GL/POLS 4605 3.0

AP/POLS 3230 3.0 Global Issues in Foreign Policy

Increasingly, problems such as environmental degradation, sustainable development, the uses and effects of technology in financial production and communication systems, human rights abuses, refugee and population movements, and militarization, require solutions that can only be realized within a system of multilateral cooperation.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the foreign policy decision-making process in terms of these global issues.

Themes:

  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Cross-listed: AK/POLS 3230 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
AS/POLS 3230 6.0,
AK/POLS 3209C 3.0 ('01-'02)

AP/POLS 3240 3.0 Multilateralism I: The United Nations, Regional Organizations, and International Law

Multilateralism concerns the management of conflict and the building of cooperation among the variety of political entities and agents that enter the field of world politics. The primary purpose of this half course is to provide the student with a better understanding of the evolving role of international, transatlantic and European organizations within the broader context of changing world politics.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Public Policy & Administration

Course Credit Exclusion:
GL/ILST 3615 6.0,
GL/POLS 3615 6.0

AP/POLS 3250 3.0 Multilateralism II: The Political Economy of International Organizations

Multilateralism concerns the management of conflict and the building of cooperation among the variety of political entities and agents that enter the field of world politics and governance. The primary purpose of this course is to build upon the introduction provided in AP/POLS 3240 3.0 and examine actual structures, processes, activities and instruments of international organizations within and outside the UN Family.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Public Policy & Administration

Prerequisite: AP/POLS 3240 3.0

Course Credit Exclusion:
GL/ILST 3615 6.0,
GL/POLS 3615 6.0

AP/POLS 3255 6.0 Human Rights in Global Economy

Explores challenges to the fulfillment of internationally recognized human rights posed by globalization, emphasizing socio-economic rights like food, security, water and livelihood rights. Examines the role of states, international institutions, corporations and civil society in protecting or threatening human rights.

Cross-listed:
AK/POLS 3260 6.0,
AP/HREQ 3010 6.0.
AP/SOSC 3010 6.0

AP/POLS 3260 6.0 War and Peace in the Middle East

This course examines the causes of conflicts in the Middle East. The history of foreign powers' involvement in the region, religious fundamentalism, authoritarianism, economic development and politics of oil and water provide the background to the conflicts. The second term focuses specifically on Arab-Israeli wars, the peace process, the conflicts in the Persian Gulf including the Iranian revolution and the Gulf Wars.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics
  • Violence & Security

Cross-listed:
AK/POLS 3260 6.0.
AP/REI 3260 6.0

Course credit exclusion: AK/POLS 3209J 6.0

AP/POLS 3262 3.0: Popular Culture & International Politics

Our common ideas about international politics present a reified world of diplomats, heads of state, military officers or, more abstractly, of states 'acting' in some way. This course asks: What can we learn about international politics from popular culture? The common notions of international politics are certainly found in many of the expressions or contemporary popular culture: novels, television, and, particularly, film have made the world of international espionage one of its staples.

With the declaration of a 'war on terror' in 2001, terrorists and the provision of security against them have also provided important themes for popular entertainments. However, by virtue of being 'popular', popular culture also presents the possibilities of politics that are not abstracted and insulated from the concerns and experiences of everyday life and experience. Thus, while international politics in popular culture can reproduce alienated or elite versions of our world's politics it can also be a site of resistance, and even more importantly a place to imagine international politics differently.

This course draws the popular culture in which we all live in our 'daily' lives into the classroom, beginning from popular culture expressions to explore the nature, limits, and possibilities of contemporary international politics.

Prerequisites: AP/POLS 2940 6.00.

AP/POLS 3270 3.0 Global Political Economy I: Theory and Approaches

The course provides students with some key conceptual tools with which to understand the global political economic processes that shape our world today. We begin with a brief discussion of contemporary theoretical perspectives and then analyze the primary forces (e.g. capital and information) and processes (colonialism, global production, and migration) that confront us. The primary objective of the course is to provide a theoretical framework to analyze these global events, as well as to develop a grounded critique of available theoretical alternatives.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Violence & Security

Cross-listed: AP/REI 3270 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3700 6.0,
AS ECON 3190 3.0,
AS/ECON 3199 3.0,
AP/REI 3270 3.0

AP/POLS 3275 3.0 Global Political Economy II: Issues and Problems Since 1945

This course focuses on issues and problems related to the post-1945 global political economy. It explores topics such as the globalization of production and the associated movement of labour, commodities and capital; the nature of global money and finance; and the relationship between capitalism, development and underdevelopment. Discussion focuses on the historical roots and future trajectory of contemporary developments—for example the transition from socialism, economic instability, global rivalry and cooperation, and the environment.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Violence & Security

Cross-listed: AP/REI 3275 3.0

Course credit exclusion:
AK/POLS 3700 6.0,
AS ECON 3190 3.0,
AS/ECON 3199 3.0,
AP/REI 3275 3.0

AP/POLS 3280 3.0 Canada and World Affairs

This course examines Canada's foreign and defence policy interests in the post-cold war era, and the domestic and international forces, processes, interests and actors which interact in the formulation, and pursuit, of these interests. In both theoretical and empirical contexts, the course analyzes Canada's bilateral and multilateral relationships within the global environment, focusing on issues of security, trade, overseas development aid, human rights, technology and communications, and environmental integrity.

Themes:

  • Public Policy & Administration
  • Global Politics
  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context

AP/POLS 3300 6.0 Statistics for Social Sciences

This course provides a basic understanding of the statistical reasoning and fundamental statistical techniques frequently used to analyze social data. It introduces students to the uses of computers and statistics in the social sciences. It helps develop critical skills necessary to evaluate empirical research.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Public Policy & Administration

Prerequisite: AP/POLS 2300 6.0

Cross-listed: AP/PPAS 3300 6.0, AS/SOCI 3030 6.0

Course credit exclusion:
AS/ECON 2500 3.0,
AS/SC/GEOG 2420 3.0,
AS/GEOG 3421 3.0,
AS/SC/KINE 2050 3.0,
AS/SC/KINE 3150 3.0,
AS/MATH 1131 3.0,
AS/MATH 1132 3.0,
AS/MATH 2560 3.0,
AS/MATH 2570 3.0,
AS/MATH 2565 3.0,
AS/PSYC 2020 6.0,
AS/PSYC 2021 3.0,
AS/PSYC 2022 3.0,
AS/PSYC 2510 3.0,
AS/PSYC 3110 3.0,
AK/MATH 2720 3.0,
AK/ADMS 3320 3.0,
AK/MATH 2720 3.0,
AK/ECON 3470 3.0,
AK/ECON 3480 3.0,
GL/MATH 1610 3.0,
GL/MATH 1620 3.0,
GL/MODR 1610 3.0,
GL/MODR 1620 3.0,
GL/POLS 2610 3.0,
GL/POLS 2620 3.0,
GL/SOCI 2610 3.0,
GL/SOCI 2620 3.0,
SC/BIOL 4085 3.0,
SC/MATH 4585 3.0

AP/POLS 3400 3.0 Political Economy of Industrial Democracies

The changes taking place in the world capitalist system have had their roots in advanced capitalist societies. But these changes have also produced profound restructuring of these societies, undermining the political arrangements that emerged in the postwar period, while putting all manner of new items on the political agenda. This course explores the key aspects of this transformation, with emphasis on Western Europe, but may also include evidence from U.S. and/or Japanese cases.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Course credit exclusion: AS/AK/POLS 3700 3.0

AP/POLS 3401 3.0 Post-Communist Transformations: Can East Become West?

The fall of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe in the early 1990's was hailed by many observers as a triumph of freedom. Building new politico-economic systems, however, remains a daunting challenge. The experiments with transplanting Western models of market economics and liberal democracy into East European societies have so far produced only limited successes and in only a few countries. The vast majority of people living in post-communist societies have been victimized by economic and social deprivation, civil wars, corruption and crime, while the main benefits of change are enjoyed by narrow elites. This course looks at the unfolding drama of post-communist politics: the attempts to organise efficient market economies and make democracy work, the struggles between and against the new "robber barons", the explosive impact of ethnic conflicts, the dangers of militarism and fascism, and the rise of new democratic movements.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 3501 3.0, AP/POLS 3720 3.0

AS POLS 3410 3.0 Global City Regions

This course explores the development of global city regions in a comparative perspective, including a critical assessment of state restructuring processes and how globalization is anchored in urban politics and the ways in which city-regions constitute sites of global contestation.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Public Policy and Administration

Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 3115 3.0

AP/POLS 3411 3.0 The Political Economy of Newly Industrialized Countries

The course examines theoretical debates concerning the political economy of industrialization in post-colonial countries through examination of specific case studies.

Themes:

  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Global Politics

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/POLS 3710 3.0

AP/POLS 3415 6.0 Work and Employment in the Global Economy

The course examines the dramatic changes in work and employment practices, new production processes and increased capital mobility against the background of the emerging global economy. Special emphasis is given to the future of women's employment, state policy, and collective bargaining.

AP/POLS 3450 3.0 Women and Politics

This course examines women's political position in advanced capitalist countries. The focus is historical, theoretical, and issue-oriented. Issues examined include the politics of racism, sexuality, reproduction, and pornography within formal political structures and community organizing.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion

Cross-listed: AP/ SOSC 3170 3.0, AS/WMST 3516 3.0, GL/WMST 3516 3.0

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/AP/POLS 3455 3.0, AS/SOSC 3175 3.0

AP/POLS 3455 3.0 Topics in Women and Politics

This course will build on its prerequisite. It examines contemporary feminist debates and dilemmas that relate to the diverse dimensions of women and politics. The main focus will be on Canada, although there will be some consideration of other countries and the implications of contemporary international and global concerns. We will explore feminist theories and practices vis-à-vis politics and power relations which take place in and outside traditional political institutions. As a result, we not only will consider women's experiences with the state, political parties, and with various public policies and legal/ constitutional issues, but we also will study the contributions of women's movements and weigh their strategic political choices. Throughout, we will analyze and assess the political implications of women's multiple, intersecting and changing identities.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion

Cross-listed: AS/SOSC 3175 3.0, AS/AK/GL WMST 3517 3.0

Course credit exclusion: AP/POLS 3450 3.0, SOSC 3170 6.0

AP/POLS 3500 3.0 The Rise and Fall of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe

The Communist challenge to capitalism was one of the major twentieth-century forces which have shaped the contemporary world. This course examines key political developments in Russia and Eastern Europe from the Russian Revolution of 1917 to the overthrow of communist regimes in 1989-1991. Among the issues discussed are: the establishment of communist regimes; the evolution of state socialist systems; social change, repression and reform; the pressures of competition with the collapse of communism; the legacy of the communist experience in the new century.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/AP/POLS 3500 6.0

AP/POLS 3510 3.0 China: Path to Modernization and Democracy

This course examines the origins and development of the modern Chinese political system. Emphasis is on the role of Mao Zedong, the post-1949 period and the reform of Chinese socialism.

Themes:

  • Development and Inequality in the Global South
  • Global Politics
  • Political Organizing & Communication

Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 3510 6.0

AP/POLS 3515 3.0 China: 21st Century Superpower?

China's relationship with the outside world has been one of the dominant themes in its development. How is China moving from its position of isolation to become a 21st century superpower? We focus on the post-1949 period, in particular, the China-Soviet relationship; American-China relations; China and Japan; China and India; Canadian-China policy; China's relations with Taiwan and Hong Kong; and China's integration into the global economy. A significant portion of the course will focus on the China trade and on key issues involved in doing business in China.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Development and Inequality in the Global South
  • Violence & Security

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/AP/POLS 3510 6.0

AP/POLS 3520 3.0 West European Politics

This course examines the different patterns of development of the states and political institutions of the major West European democracies. It therefore has a historical and political-economic, as well as an institutional focus.

Themes:

  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Gender, Diversity, & Inclusion

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/AP/POLS 3530 3.0, AK/POLS 3520 6.0, GL/POLS 3210 6.0, GL/POLS 2315F 6.0

AP/POLS 3521 3.0: A Polity in Flux

This course examines the processes and policies of European integration. It pays particular attention to the advantages of closer integration on the European continent while also considering the difficulties of governing a multi-level and multi-national polity. Topics include current European issues such as the Euro and Euro-zone crisis, enlargement, democratic accountability as well as specific policy areas.

Course credit exclusion: AP/POLS 4515 3.00.

AP/POLS 3540 3.0 American Government and Politics

This course analyzes the American political system through an examination of recent political events. Attention is given to the composition of the socio-political elite, the nature of mass influence in public policies, and the operation of such major institutions as the congress, courts, presidency and political parties.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Organizing & Communication
  • Public Policy & Administration

Course credit exclusion: AK/POLS 3430 6.0, GL/POLS 3230 6.0

AP/POLS 3545 3.0 Freedom and Inequality: An American Dilemma

This course explores the impact of the institutionalized ideal of freedom on America's political economy. Also discussed are: unequal access to democratic institutions; the welfare system; global responsibility for freedom; and political repression and the policing of dissent.

Themes:

  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Law, Social Justice, & Ethics

AP/POLS 3550 3.0 Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Central America

We examine post-World War II Central American politics in light of theories of revolution. We address national and international political and social forces that explain the emergence and success or failure of revolutionary movements and counterrevolutionary offensives in the region.

Themes

  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Course Credit Exclusion: AS/AP/POLS 3550 6.0

AP/POLS 3553 6.0 Political Economy of Latin America and Caribbean

This course examines the history and political economy of the Americas using case studies from both the English and Spanish speaking Caribbean countries as well as Latin America, to highlight the forces that have shaped the internal politics of the region and its relationship to world markets.

Themes:

  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Global South
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Cross-Listed: AS/SOSC 3410 6.0

Course credit exclusion: AP/POLS 3790 6.0

AP/POLS 3555 3.0 Dictatorship and Democratization in South America

We examine post-World War II experiences of dictatorship and democratization in South America. We discuss regional trends and specific countries (such as Brazil, Chile and Peru) from a political economy perspective, including class relations, popular organizations, and political institutions.

Themes:

  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power

AP/POLS 3560 6.0 The Global South: Politics, Policy & Development

The course examines the various dimensions of the Global South, with emphasis on political-economy and development. It examines the similarities and differences between various local experiences in the Global South and explores their contemporary dynamic in a historical context.

Themes:

  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Global Politics
  • Political Economy & Political Power

AP/POLS 3561 6.0 Racism and the Law

Theories of law applied to the sociology of racism. Topics include history of law and the political economy of racism; reproductions of class, race and gender; promises and prospects of legal remedies; local/global and private/public controls.

Cross-Listed: AP/REI 3561 6.0

Course credit exclusions: AK/SOCI3340D 6.0 and AK/SOCI 3640D 6.0

AP/POLS 3565 6.0 Racism & Colonialism

Colonialism and racial conflict examined in historical and comparative perspective, including a discussion of links between racism and sexism. Examples are drawn from some of these areas: Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East.

Course credit exclusion: AP/REI 3620 6.00 (prior to Fall 2013), AP/SOCI 3620 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/SOCI 2580 6.00 (prior to Summer 1998), AK/SOCI 3620 6.00.

AP/POLS 3570 3.0 Africa: The Politics of Continental CRISIS

This course examines the processes -- globalization, war and democratization, among others -- crucial to prospects for political, social and economic development in Africa. The Congo, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa are among the possible countries to be studied.

Themes:

  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Political Economy & Political Power
  • Violence & Security

Course credit exclusion: GL/POLS 3200 3.0

AP/POLS 3591 3.0 Political Economy of Asia and Pacific

The course studies the political and economic changes in the region of Asia and the Pacific and their implications for the global capitalist system. Interactions between the state, capital, classes, and gender are discussed.

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Development & Inequality in the Global South
  • Political Economy & Political Power

Prerequisite: AP/POLS 2930 (previously 2920 6.00) Course Credit Exclusion: GL/ILST 4680 6.0, GL/POLS 4680 6.0

AP/POLS 3900 3.0 Local to Global: City and Nation in the Age of Globalization

This course examines political experience in the era of "globalization." Issues covered include work in the global city; immigration and racism; culture and media; women and the international division of labour; and environmental sustainability. (Designed for students who plan to graduate with an ordinary B.A.)

Themes:

  • Global Politics
  • Canadian Democracy in a North American Context

AP/POLS 3990 3.0/6.0 Supervised Reading and Research

A supervised reading course allows a student to work one-on-one with a faculty member to complete a course. Students may take a supervised course, either on a full- year or half-year basis, if they meet the following requirements:

  • Have completed at least 54 credits (nine full course equivalents) completed at the University
  • Currently majoring in Political Science, normally with at least 18 credits completed in Political Science in good standing.
  • Have identified a full time faculty member from the LA&PS Political Science department whose research interests match his/her proposed topic(s) and who is willing to work with you on the course.
  • Not duplicate the scope and content of a regularly scheduled course, and should be on a topic in which the student already has done some course work.
  • Observe the normal term deadlines for completing work and submitting grades.

Steps to take:

  1. Pick up the Supervised Reading and Research con- tract form from the Political Science Undergraduate Office (S672 Ross).
  2. Consult with full-time members of the Department to locate a full-time faculty member willing to work with you on your course. Approach faculty members in person with a written plan of what you would like to do, including a bibliography. For a list of full-time faculty in LA&PS Political Science, see the faculty section of our mini-calendar.
  3. Note: LA&PS faculty members are often unavailable during the summer, so it is best to plan a reading course for September to April.
  4. In consultation with the faculty member, complete the form, including an outline, a description of the reading course, grade breakdown, and reading list, etc.
  5. The student must return the signed form, in person, to the Undergraduate office (both the faculty member and the student must sign.)